Fullback Wrap-Around Draw

Every year several different discussions will pop up on the various football forums surrounding what some call a trick play and others call a hidden hand-off or even misdirection.  I have seen this play given many names including Wrap Around Draw, Ghost Trap, Ghost Draw, Pimp Juice and even just FB Draw.  The basics of the play are quite simple but it can have devastating effects when executed correctly.

Whether the QB is under center (most people run it from this type of formation) or in the shotgun, the QB either drops back or rolls out to show pass (some coaches even have their linemen yell pass to confuse the defense and add to the fake of the QB).  At the snap of the ball the FB will take his position (this will depend on the formation or offense you are running) and settle in with one hand on his far hip creating a pocket and his off side hand resting in front of the pocket to help ensure the ball doesn’t get pushed too far through the pocket.  This technique is demonstrated here:

As you can see, even with no other players in view the actual exchange is quite difficult to see no matter the angle you are viewing it from.  As it occurs faster and faster in the technique video the exchange becomes almost invisible.  Of course it is extremely important for the FB to pause and sit still with the ball on his hip while the defenders’ eyes follow the QB farther and farther away from the ‘new’ ball carrier.  Then once he can afford to wait no longer, he must explode up the field and gain as many yards as possible.  As you will see in the video examples below, the more patient the FB, the more effective the play tends to be.  Of course it helps for the FB to have some speed for once he is in the open field but it can work with slower FBs as well. Continue reading Fullback Wrap-Around Draw

The Wild Bunch: A Conflict-Theoretical Approach to Football Offense

Internet Gridiron Guru Ted Seay has finally published his book about his Wild Bunch Offense … I asked and he was kind enough to give us a preview of the book … 

If interested here is a link to the FACEBOOK PAGE.

And here is a link to the AMAZON PAGE if you want to buy it.

About the Book:

For the football coach and/or athletic director looking for a winning edge for their program; for the fan who yearns to dig beneath the game-day blather of TV “experts”; for students of conflict theory who find themselves attracted to the American version of football because they sense far more strategic thought at work than with, say, soccer; this book is for you!

The Wild Bunch offense features “modular” elements of some of the best-known football offensive systems of the past 50 years, and it does so in a way that maximizes deception and misdirection through what I call the “unity of apparent intent” – making one thing on offense look like another, and another, and another, long enough to confuse the defense and prevent the kind of swarming gang-tackling that the best defenses feature. These “modules” include play series borrowed from the Air Raid passing attack, the Fly Sweep offense, the Bunch passing attack, and the Run & Shoot offense.

A long time in gestation, the elements of the Wild Bunch system were first shared over Internet coaching boards in the late 1990s, and the offense has been in use ever since in both North America and Europe. As a result of my “day job” as a U.S. Foreign Service Officer, I have been able to clinic and install the Wild Bunch in five countries on three continents, as well as spreading its basic theory and premises to coaches in some 8-10 other countries.

The present volume represents a number of milestones for the Wild Bunch: First publication; first simplification and codification of its plays into four series; and above all, first working of the Wild Bunch offense into the larger framework of my professional and academic research on conflict avoidance, amelioration and resolution theory, or CAART. This last point has occasioned two major differences from previous collections of Wild Bunch plays which I have posted along the way to Internet coaching forums: First, an in-depth analysis of the strategic underpinnings of North American (American and Canadian) football; and following from that, a spirited defense of the game itself in the face of what appear to be concerted attacks on its very existence, starting with youth football, but aiming inexorably at the game in every form.

While other books have dealt with components of the Wild Bunch offense, none has put together its modular elements into the kind of seamless whole which can misdirect defenses at will and increase scoring opportunities for smaller and less-talented squads. Nor has any football book on a particular system gone into such detail on the strategic infrastructure of the game – into the “Why” of offensive maneuvers, rather than simply the “What” and “How”. The great advantage of understanding why to call certain plays is, inter alia, to better know when to call them – when the opponent has been sufficiently deceived as to allow priceless scoring opportunities, no matter how superior they might appear to your squad on paper. Continue reading The Wild Bunch: A Conflict-Theoretical Approach to Football Offense

Zero Technique: How to Run Out the Clock

Zero Technique: How to Run Out the Clock.

Menominee’s 49 Short Option Play

This article was originally posted on Direct Snap Football.

In the Beginning

Since the beginning of time…or at least since 1966, Menominee has run the single wing under Ken Hofer. In the late 1960’s, 1970’s and the early to mid-1980’s we were a running team. We threw the ball 6-8 times per game to keep the defense honest. From the mid-1980’s through the present we’ve become more air oriented.

Meno-SW

Passing Through the Years
Our passing game has increased not only the amount of times we throw, but the number of pass plays we now have at our disposal. The one thing that has remained constant through the years is the 49 Short Option Pass. This play is our bread-and-butter play along with our power off-tackle play, 48 Blast. Continue reading Menominee’s 49 Short Option Play

Diamond Quads Spread Single Wing

Originally posted on Direct Snap Football.

As I go over my spread quad series I am going to relate this offense to a chess board, specifically to the end game of a chess match.

While teaching chess I usually start by making sure players understand the end game as soon as possible. Studies have shown that kids enjoy chess much more when they know how to finish off a game when they get the lead.

Teaching end game in chess is very simple because I use the same strategies that I do when I am coaching on the field of battle in football. In chess once you get to the end game you have fewer pieces and need to examine the entire board to evaluate where your players are versus the other player’s pieces on the board.

I have been a traditionalist when it comes to single wing football which means that I tend to see single wing football very narrowly minded. Change is not one of those things that I have been taught to employ while running a true power single wing formation. So when I began devising a spread single wing attack, I wanted to make sure I was sticking with what I was taught to believe to be TRUE single wing football.

The following is a list of items which I believe are unchangeable single wing elements that must be employed in my quad spread single wing attack: Continue reading Diamond Quads Spread Single Wing

Helping Coaches Helping Kids

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